Education

School spending in the states

School spending in the states

School spending in the states, presented in an interactive visualization. The Elementary/Secondary Information System (ElSi) is a project of National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). NCES is "the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to education in the U.S. and other nations. NCES is located within the U.S. Department of Education and the Institute of Education Sciences." Here is data from ElSi regarding per-pupil revenue and spending in the states. (more…)
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Nation’s report card has little good news

Nation’s report card has little good news

This year's results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) hold little good news. Following, the Center for Education Reform summarizes. Statement on Shocking Education Report Assessment Finds Majority of U.S. Students Have Declined in Core Subjects WASHINGTON D.C. (10.30.19) — The Center for Education Reform (CER), a national leader in the fight to achieve educational excellence in the United States, today issued a statement by CER founder and CEO Jeanne Allen regarding the new scores revealed this morning by the National Center on Education Statistics in the annual National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP), also known as “The…
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In NAEP mapping study, Kansas shines

In NAEP mapping study, Kansas shines

In a new edition of a study that assesses the stringency of state school assessments, Kansas performs well. States are free to create their own tests to measure the performance of students in their schools. There is variability in how stringently states construct their tests. The U.S. Department of Education, through the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), conducts the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) every other year. Known as "The Nation's Report Card," it is "the largest nationally representative and continuing assessment of what America's students know and can do in various subject areas." [1. National Assessment of…
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Education gap on Wichita City Council

Education gap on Wichita City Council

Currently there is discussion in Wichita on whether higher education is valued by residents. Following, from April 2011, a look at the educational achievement of the Wichita City Council. The members of the council cited below were Lavonta Williams, Sue Schlapp, Jim Skelton, Paul Gray, Jeff Longwell, and Janet Miller. Carl Brewer was mayor. Before Jim Skelton left the council in January, none of the four men serving on the Wichita City Council had completed a college degree. The three women serving on the council set a better example, with all three holding college degrees. Of the candidates running in…
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Tax benefits for education don’t increase education

Tax benefits for education don’t increase education

Here's evidence of a government program that, undoubtedly, was started with good intentions, but hasn't produced the intended results. Tax season ended last week. Taxpayers have filed for over $30 billion in credits and deductions for college expenses they paid in 2017. Evidence now clearly shows that these credits have zero effect on college attendance. The tax credits surely make those who get them better off, but they do nothing to increase education. If their intent is to increase schooling, they are a failure. Continue reading at The Brookings Institution article The tax benefits for education don’t increase education.
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