Kansas legislature special session possible

Yesterday’s edition of the KPTS television public affairs program Ask Your Legislator featured talk on taxes and speculation that a special session of the Kansas Legislature might be needed this summer.

Senator John Vratil, a Republican from Leawood and vice-president of the Senate, said that the way to solve the budget problem is through a combination of cuts and tax increases. He said its unlikely that there will be increases in income taxes and property taxes.

Vratil has been in favor of a variety of tax increases, including raising the sales tax and starting a tax on soda pop.

Representative Marti Crow, a Leavenworth Democrat said she’s heard rumors that House leadership is talking about “going home” without a budget. She said it’s been a “do nothing” year in the house, and that it’s irresponsible for the legislature to not be doing its job.

Vratil said that the Senate leadership has taken the position that the budget should be handled until after the consensus revenue estimates become available on April 16. This is different from the usual practice, where the legislature creates on budget by the end of March, and then revises it after the April estimates are available.

He said it is possible that there could be a special session of the legislature in July to deal with the budget.

Both Vratil and Crow said that there will probably be future efforts to extend the recently-passed smoking ban in Kansas to include casino floors. They also added that their constituents are in favor of tax increaes.

Reporting from the Lawrence Journal-World is at Senate vice president says special session on budget possible.

3 Comments

  • Their constituents are in FAVOR of tax increases? Conservatives had better get on the stick and start contacting their legislators more. I do NOT WANT ANY tax increases!! Cut spending!!!

  • KipSchroeder -

    “She said it’s been a “do nothing” year in the house, and that it’s irresponsible for the legislature to not be doing its job.”

    I would counter Rep. Crow’s statement by saying that a “do nothing” legislature is the best kind to have. In most cases, each new law diminishes our freedoms in some way. In those rare cases where bills are proposed to guarantee or support our freedoms (think Health Care Freedom Amendment) the legislature does the wrong thing. I appreciate men and women of conviction like Rep. Aaron Jack who were very clear with their constituents about how they would vote and have since lived up to their pledges. Here is Rep. Jack’s for example:

    1. Is it Topeka’s Business?
    2. Does it Promote Self-Reliance?
    3. Is it Responsible and Can We Afford it?
    4. Does it Incentivize Saving and Investment?
    5. Does it Encourage Achievement?
    6. Does it Make Kansas More Prosperous?
    7. Does it Make Us Safer?
    8. Does it Make Topeka More or Less Transparent?
    9. Does it Reflect Our District’s Values?
    10. Does it Increase or Decrease the Financial Burden on Our Children and Grandchildren?

    This is excellent representation!

  • Let’s urge Kansas lawmakers to end the casino exemption in the smoking ban!
    Casinos are owned and operated by the Kansas govt. and there is NO justification for them to not have to follow the law. Why should the law not apply to the govt.? Exposing the employees to cancer-causing secondhand smoke all day every day is criminal! It’s unjust, it’s a human rights violation!
    The rights of people to BREATHE CLEAN AIR is a priority, a right, and it should be protected!
    Cheryl is a casino employee who was laid off from her job. Three months later she thought she had the flu, or was it asthma? It turned out to be Stage IV lung cancer! And she never smoked! She was a secondhand smoker…
    You can see her on YouTube, “casino lung cancer.”

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