Chemical facility anti-terrorism standards

In the world of chemical security, the real world

A post on a blog sponsored by the National Association of Manufacturers explains a few of the problems with the proposed Chemical facility anti-terrorism standards legislation now making its way through Congress. One of the issues mentioned in the post In the World of Chemical Security, the Real World is the threat of excessive litigation: "But there are problems with the proposals, as he makes clear. He cites the 'private right of action,' i.e., encouraging litigation against companies as a parallel regulatory process." Unlike environmental statutes, CFATS is not a series of prescriptive statutory measures with which compliance is mandatory,…
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Current chemical security regulations should be reauthorized

Currently two committees in the United States House of Representatives are considering legislation that would harm a vital American industry. This industry is already regulated, and the regulations have accomplished their goal. As explained by the Texas Chemical Council: The current chemical security regulations are enforced by the Department of Homeland Security, which has clear authority to inspect facilities and apply strong penalties for non-compliance. Since the regulations have been in place, not one incident as a result of terrorism has occurred. These regulations have been effective. Removing the sunset date and making the chemical security regulations permanent would provide…
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Chemical security act would harm business, farmers

The Kansas Meadowlark contributes coverage about a chemical security law that promises to overburden an important American industry. Even the family farm is at risk. That's the operative word -- risk. As has been reported, Congressional testimony found that the legislation could actually increase risk to the businesses that the bill intends to protect. An important point of this article is the involvement of the left-wing Center for American Progress. Coverage of this issue on this blog is available by clicking on Chemical facility anti-terrorism standards. To read the coverage at the Kansas Meadowlark, click on Do we want Homeland…
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Chemical security act could affect Wichita water rates

The United States Congress is considering legislation that aims to increase the security of America's chemical industry to terrorism threats. The legislation, if passed, would require chemical companies to substitute government-mandated processes and technology for their current processes. The post Chemical security law goes beyond protection explains more about this legislation. Even places that we might not consider to be "chemical plants" could fall under this act. The Center for American Progress -- described by Wikipedia as "a liberal political policy research and advocacy organization," an understatement if there ever was one -- has produced a report titled Chemical Security…
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Let representatives know about Chemical Facility Antiterrorism Act

As reported in this website, Congress is considering legislation that threatens to harm the American economy, while at the same time accomplishing little or none of its stated goals. Articles like Chemical Facility Security Authorization Act threatens American economy give more detail. It's important to let your elected representatives in Washington know how harmful this proposed law will be to a vital American industry. An easy way to let them know is by clicking on this link: Ask Your Legislator to Oppose the Chemical Facility Antiterrorism Act. This will take you to a form where you fill in your name…
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Chemical facilities act would increase cost, not safety

Update: Let your elected representatives in Washington know about this legislation. Send them a message by clicking here. As reported earlier, the United States Congress is considering legislation -- the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards -- that will increase regulation on chemical plants and facilities. Even the Wichita Water Works is on a list of facilities that would possibly be required to undergo expensive modifications if this new law passes. (See Chemical security law goes beyond protection) The proposed legislation, however, would extend government control into another of our nation’s most important industries. It would require companies to change their manufacturing…
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Chemical Facility Security Authorization Act threatens American economy

Update: Let your elected representatives in Washington know about this legislation. Send them a message by clicking here. Earlier this week I reported on legislation being considered by Congress that would, under the lofty goal of national security, impose a huge burden on the American chemical industry. (Chemical security law goes beyond protection) Our agricultural industries need to be concerned, too. The article Homeland Security To Regulate Farm and Ranch Inputs? details some of the harm that excessive government interference will cause. For example, the legislation "proposes to mandate the government to take a large measure of control over products…
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Chemical security law goes beyond protection

Congress is about to consider legislation that, on the surface, seems like it implements an important goal. Its name -- Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards -- suggests something that no one could oppose. The proposed legislation, however, would extend government control into another of our nation's most important industries. It would require companies to change their manufacturing processes and substitute products in the name of safety. But the legislation may not produce its intended effect. As the letter below states: "Congressional testimony found that this could actually increase risk to the businesses that the bill intends to protect." If you need…
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